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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 934 (some duplicates have been removed)
will the global economy go next and what will it mean to your portfolio as the u.s. stock market sets a new five-year high. >>> i'll have any candid conversation with outspoken jpmorgan chase ceo jamie dimon. we'll talk real estate, banking, his pay cut. >> we had run terrible year. >>> and she's called the oprah of china. remarkable entrepreneur who runs a media empire and reaches more than 200 million people a month. "on the money" begins right now. >>> this is america's number one financial news program, "on the money." now, maria bartiromo. >> this is what's making news as we head into a new week "on the money." washington has a new watchdog for wall street. president obama has nominated mary jo white the head of securities and exchange commission. white is a former prosecutor with a reputation for toughness. she will replace mary schapiro and must still be confirmed by the senate. timothy geithner spent his last day as secretary on friday, stepping down after a tumultuous four years in the financial system. president obama's chief of staff jack lew has been nominated to replace geithner. >>
the economy, about where the markets would go post financial crisis. what's next for america and the global economy? ken rogoff joining me once again with some answers. ken, good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. how would you describe the mood in davos and how would you see the economy today five years post the crisis? >> it's a strange mood in davos, where people are not euphoric. in fact, you talk to heads of multinational corporations, businesspeople around the world, they say, you know, things aren't even as good as i thought they would be this quarter, but they're calmer. there's a feeling that the world is not going to fall apart. you hear more about geopolitical risk, cyber security, d less about europe's going to blow up tomorrow. >> so, you're not seeing over enthusiasm but it's certainly better than a year ago? >> yes, it's definitely, definitely calmer. their theme here is resilient. yes, and dynamism, not so much. guess what i thought about the global economy. i actually think that growth will be moderate with not necessarily a lot of volatility
tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about th
to grow the economy, shrink government and create confidence that we are not greece. and, oh, heck, my friend steve kroft lobbed a bunch of softballs at president obama and hillary clinton in his "60 minutes" interview last night. and you know what, folks, we still do not know what happened on that tragic, awful night in benghazi when four people were killed. the administration spun two separate stories, we still don't know the narrative. all that, the "kudlow report" starts right now. >>> first up tonight, it could prove to be the most significant immigration reform in years. bipartisan group of four democratic and four republican senators unveiling their blueprint this afternoon for border security, guest worker cards, more foreign brainiacs and employer verification, maybe even a path to citizenship. cnbc's own eamon javers joins us now with the details. good evening, eamon. >> well, we've almost gotten out of practice at watching bipartisan groups of senators hold press conferences here in washington. that's not something we're used to seeing. in recent months, anyway. but the sena
is a senior fellow at our global economy, and i will sit with him and asking a few questions. and then we will turn to questions over to you, the audience. we will have simultaneous translation. my mother, may she rest in piece, is a greek language teacher. she will be rolling in a great asset to my own good piece on. so without i give you alexis tsipras. [applause] >> please join your piece to number two for the translation. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i want to express our opinions, our view on the cause of the crisis, and our vision for the necessary changes that have to take place in greece. so that we can change from becoming guinea pigs of the crisis to the country that will serve as the starting point for new, progressive changes that will lead the worldwide economy to safe harbors. and so it is a special honor for me to be here at brookings. this is a foundation with strong traditions and document conversation with facts. this is a foundation that and cn understand what's at stake, both in greece and in europe today. when i was young i remember those older than me t
pockets, but we may be losing our competitive edge. some say it's because america's fragile economy is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical
(train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ >> republicans sharpening their budget knives. democrats just licking their political shops. frankly, we don't know what all the fuss is about. ♪ welcome, everybody. i'm cheryl casone. republicans planning to outdo paul ryan with a budget blueprint that has democrats crying. we are wondering why. this is a ten year plan. in the lot can change into an years. does look at how things change the last ten years. ten years ago barack obama was unknown. in years ago lance armstrong was like to. in years ago there was no iphone. i think it was called itunes. a lot has happened in ten years. it makes you wonder what will happen in the next ten years which is making our next guest wonder if the fuss over these cuts is all for
of the game. kicking the can is the best way to describe what happens. think of the economy and where it could be in tin years. unemployment, the rate of inflation with the federal reserve policies, we might be looking in a significant threat of inflation. so in the amount of budget cutting that they do, the value of dollars cut will be diminished. cheryl: she has a great point, and there is another issue. in fact, if you look at overall what congress can are cannot do in the next and here's, they're going to change their minds. we have seen that with the fight over entitlement programs. everyone comes in saying there will address medicare, social security and medicaid, and they never do it because reelection comes of senate and later. >> well, in fact, we should be celebrating an anniversary, popping champagne corks because it was exactly 12 years ago tomorrow that alan greenspan testified before congress and said the biggest challenge this country has in terms of fiscal issues is that the budget surplus is getting so large that we will have no choice but to buy stock in private companies. tw
a few green sheets of the economy and if that begins to surge, david axelrod tells me later in the show, has a real chance. >> he has a huge agenda, a lot of opportunities and going to have to find a way to work with republicans not only in the senate but the house of representatives. let's see if he can do it. it's a huge, huge challenge and the responsibility is enormous, the opportunity is great. >> well, we have to see and itching to get to the party, wolf. >> love those people back there. did you hear the marching band? >> you know why i think they're so excited? your performance in skyfall. >> you were in "flight." >> that's why i wanted to mention it. >> i was in the james bond film. and you were in -- >> really great. really great for me. >> if you work really hard and play by the rules, some day maybe daniel craig and -- >> was it daniel craig or denzel washington oscar nominated? >> i don't know. >> it was denzel. do you know who helped him? me. >> let me point out. $1 billion in box office receipts worldwide. $1 billion. >> british, british. skyfall. wolf, go partying. >> tha
driven economy to consumption. so you're probably not going to see double digit growth but i think 8% is in the cards. >> is the u.s. still the best place? >> yes. >> to invest, guys? >> mandy, what is frightening here is that we all agree that some of the best opportunities are overseas. perhaps those markets need to play catch up here. i would also add that commodities have been an area left in the dust. if the fed is very successful, igniting inflation, which may be in the cards in the future commodities would be a place to hedge someone's portfolio as they get out of bonds into equities right now. very quickly we're noting today apple is, let me put it this way. exxon is close to overtaking apple as the most valuable stock in the world. significant at all? are you guys watching that at all? >> we are watching it. it is old schools coming back to modern day trading markets that are here. we've all watched apple. we've seen the run in apple. everyone is very familiar with the stock and the products. it just got to prices that were way too lofty for retail investors and when we star
hours trading. that tells me that the economy is doing better. what is your take? >> i think the economy is more mixed. it seems to me, google hot today and obviously a great tech story and also an advertising tostory. friday, general electric. kind of told us that world economic expectations might be better. is the world better? >> i think it is possible that the eearnings are going to be better. if you look at the bottom of estimates, they were $114 for the s&p -- i'm sorry $120 they are coming down. we suspect they are going to continue to come down. we suspect the corporate earnings are going to come down. i want to add economic stuff to this. today, existing home sales 12.8% above a year ago. existing home sale prices plus 11%. that is progress it was falling at 4%. last week, manufacturing up, capitol goods up. are he ewe estimating the econo? >> clients are asking me about upside risk. nobody is asking about upside risk. i think the question is, is it in the price already. >> all related to the housing ready. for, the fed is easy. we all know the fed is easy because it has a feder
a lot of positives about the u.s. economy, if washington can get its act together, but europe is still a big issue. what do you think about europe right now? have we made progress? and what's to come? >> well, i think there's some big, long term things they need to do in europe over the next 5-7 years. they've done some structural forms. they've raised their pension ages. they've done labor market reforms. nothing has happened in the united states. absolutely nothing. and i think their reasons for optimism from the shale, which, by the way, that's an area where people are excited to talk about that. and, you know, there's some optimism coming from the easy money, i suppose, still. but i think in the united states, you know, if we get to the consensus, which seems to be 3% at the end of the year, i think that would be good. >> let me ask you about the economy. relative to what ee's going on washington. we voted that the house extended to see a debt ceili ining for a months. how does this play out? >> forever. i mean, that's the short answer. forever. they don't agree. so we're seeing an
. by doing this, we sent a not so subtle signal that the focus of our country is on the farm economy of washington, d.c. instead of that really come out here in charlotte, new orleans, and cheyenne. we as republicans have to accept government number crunching. it is not the answer to our nation's problems. we've got to face one cold hard fact -- washington is a dysfunctional that any budget proposed based on fiscal sanity will be deemed not series by the media and it will fail in the united states senate and will not make it to the president's desk where he would veto it anyway. any serious proposal to restrain government growth is immediately deemed non-serious in washington, d.c. the balanced budget amendment is called non-serious as are term limits, capping federal growth to the growth of the private sector economy is deemed not serious in washington, d.c. anything serious is deemed not serious in washington d.c.. when senator obama voted against raising the debt ceiling, he said he was doing so because the national debt was at an outrageous $8 trillion. he clarified for a fact --
green sheet of the economy if that was to begin to surge, he could have real chance of doing some big stuff. >> he's got a huge agenda. he's going to have to find way to work with the republicans. it's a huge challenge. the responsibility is enormous. the opportunity is great. >> i can see you're itching to get to the party. >> did can you hear the grambling university marching band? >> i hate to tell you i was in the james bond film. >> really great to me. >> was it daniel craig or denzel washington got nominated? >> i don't know. >> it was denzel. >> let me point out sky fall. $1 billion in box office receipts worldwide. $1 billion. >> british. >> sky fall. >> wolf, go party. such an honor to be in his presence. it's a night out of celebration here in washington. the star studded parties are continuing to pour out. we'll bring you the highlights as they happen. joining me rising democratic star, san antonio mayor. he knows about the presidency than any other person alive. let me start with you. you gave a sensational performance. barack obama did the same thing and became president.
>>> on our broadcast tonight, signs of life in the american economy. near record highs on wall street, a housing turn-around under way. the problem is, a lot of americans aren't feeling it yet. >>> there is a new outbreak to worry about, spreading like wildfire across our country. and unlike the flu, for this one there is no vaccine. >>> the dark cloud hanging over a big american city. doctors say the air is so bad, it's the equivalent of forcing every resident to become a heavy smoker. >>> and seeing red. a push by republicans to change the way we elect a president. if these had been the rules across the map in november, we would have president romney. >>> also, a big night for the biggest blockbuster of all-time. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. the evidence is now unmistakable. aspects of the u.s. economy after a long and difficult period of darkness appear to be getting more robust. and while there are lots of numbers out to prove the point of an improving economy,
showdown from showdown? and how will the economy respond to what is or is not accomplished here in washington? my exclusive guest this morning will have something to say about all of this. house budget chairman and the republican party's 2012 vice presidential nominee paul ryan here for his first live interview since the election. chairman, welcome back to meat meet. >> great to be back with you. >> let's talk about this top priority of the budget battle. it will really mark the beginning of the president's second term. the debt ceiling has been raised, at least temporarily, but there are still big decisions to be made. you specifically said in the last few days that your priority is to make a big down payment on the debt. a debt crisis that you see in this country. >> that's right. >> what do you specifically require? what's the priority? what has the president got to do in your point of view? >> i'll just explain what the speaker said when we passed that bill. our goal is to get cuts and reforms that put us on a path to balancing the budget in a decade. we think the senate oug
economy. obviously, the u.s. economy is still a global leader. we wanted to remain that way. the political debated home has been very much about jobs and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders from the eu and the other sort of entities that are here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all of this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> we have a natural gas boom and we have an oil boom and we have, thanks to low interest rates, what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much more can happen and, in fact, it seems like the only body, the only institution that might stand in the way of 2013 being a great year is congress. >> well, listen, there is certainly not the outcome that anybody wants. and i'm hoping that after we've been through the election and last november. we've been through a fiscal cliff debate. we are working our way through a debt ceiling debate. i think in a responsible manner. with an e
economy and its resilience and its ability to come back from the dumps? >> yeah, well, it is a little bit of all of that. we will never know how it would have worked out if there had been a different president of the united states. but you do know that the federal reserve has been quite instrumental here in pushing rates to historically low levels, flooding the economy with money, and chasing people into risk assets with the idea that that would create a sense of wealth, and therefore spending, and that is to a degree working. and the other side is that the american economy is tremendously resilient. so we are on a path to recovery. there are some head winds that are enduring. we're growing about half what we would like to grow at, but we are in a recovery, and i expect that 2013 will look a lot like 2012, 2% kind of growth which is not terrible, not great, but good enough. >> it feels like we're running on a treadmill. we're in the same exact spot and we keep running and running and getting nowhere. so jim, my question -- or peter, i should say, let's bring in peter here. my question for
so we can keep interest rates low so we can make sure we don't hurt our economy. >> i want to command -- commend you on the effort of people to just put out a budget. with all due respect on my friends on the other side, last year they were in majority, they chose not to do that. they chose thinking it would provide political cover. it didn't. i think that's what's gone "encore booknotes" the senate side. calculation that somehow this will spare some of our members from difficult votes. i commend you for developing a difficult budget and getting your colleagues to vote on it and it was a legitimate issue in the campaign. i think it's an appropriate place to have the discussion. you come, you vote, we go have a campaign. that helps the country clarify the issues. we move on. the house has fulfilled its responsibility in that regard in through the fire in the election. i think that's fair. the senate just simply has not. and it is discouraging. you know, it just takes 51 votes. that's all it takes over there. i actually heard commentators tell us, oh, no, it takes 60. it takes no such t
with zeros on the budget sheet we on the economy of washington, d.c. instead of the real economy. out here in charlotte, in new orleans n sleever port. we have to accept government number crunching, even conservive number crunching is not the answer to our nation's problems. we have to face another cold hard fact. washington is so dysfunctional that it will be deemed not serious by the media. it will fail in the united states senate and wouldn't maket to the president's desk where he would veto it any way. any serious propose toll restrain government decpwroth deemed non-serious in washington, d.c. the balanced budget amendment is called non-serious in washington, d.c. term limits are non-serious in washington, d.c. capping the federal growth also deemed not serious in washington, d.c. the truth is anything serious is deemed not serious in washington, d.c. when then senator obama voted against racing the debt ceiling he said he was doing so because the national debt was at an outrageous $8 trillion. i want to quote the president saying $8 trillion, that's trillion with a t. it is now over
show talking about immigration? because it's about jobs, growing an economy and getting a broken immigration system out of our way and immigration system for the 21st century. ron brownstein, ana navarro, thank you. >> thank you. >>> america thought it had fixed a broken immigration system before, giving people a pathway to citizenship. >> future generations of americans will be thankful for our efforts to humanly regain control of our borders and therefore preserve the value of american sit stenship. >> why it could be the key to the jobs bottom we desperately need. als now... at officemax. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. our financial advice is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings retirement advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. learn more with our free usaa retirement guide. call 877-242-usaa. thor gets great rewards for his small business! your boa! [ garth ]
to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think one of the challenges will be for him to recognize that the economic instrument in trade is really very important. if you look at asia, the coin of the realm in asia is trade and economics and, you know, if we're going to have a rebalancing toward asia, it needs to be an economics and trade overwhelmingly. so he's got, i think, a real opportunity to help lead the administration in using all of our instruments for national power influence, particularly economic and trade. >> brown: what do you think -- i mean, i know what you think about -- we talked about this in your last book about the need for economic thinking, i guess, changing the way we think about the world. but do you think that the administration has understood that wel
hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was se
going in, but not as much. and of course the anxiety of potentially healthy global economy is always going to give traders an excuse to try to sell what is close to some historically low levels of yield, high levels of price. >> yeah. and when you look at equities you see this huge move in the markets. are we taking a bit of a breather? jordan, how do you see it? >> i think it's been constrained. uncertain election and fiscal cliff. and all of a sudden people are starting to pay attention to the fact there are -- inflation's low. i think the market starts to run, forest run. >> not a lot of alternatives out there. right? >> even the high paying growth stocks are paying more to bonds. and the allocation hasn't happened yet. but beware. i think that could happen. >> john, what gets people to make the great exodus out of treasuries and into equities? if you're looking to the catalyst of what can take it to the next level, that would certainly be one of them. >> yeah. i think we have to see a lot higher level of inflation which we haven't seen thus far. you have corporate yields, dividen
spend more. that's not going to help the economy, and that is not going to close the gap and balance the budget. the reason we want to balance the budget is not to make the numbers add up. we think that's necessary for growth and opportunity. we think it's necessary to make sure that our kids don't get this debt that they won't be able to handle if we keep going down the path we are on. >> but there are certainly those in the white house who would take issue with what you said or might even say to use your own criticism that's a straw man argume argument. they were prepared to cut additional spending to be part of a bigger agreement that republicans weren't able to agree to. there is more room for spending cuts. it's a matter of how you do it. >> the president was insisting on more stimulus spending during the fiscal cliff negotiations. he didn't get that. they haven't put out a plan. the reason we wanted the debt limit extended was to showcase our budget. we will put a budget up that says here is our plan for economic growth and balancing the budget, entitlement reform which is nece
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 934 (some duplicates have been removed)